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Dove Launches #MyHairAMiModo-Hairstylists Given Tools to Confront Stereotypes and Build Positivity


Authored By: Rashida Ashley


I remember the first time I watched Bomba Estereo's Soy Yo. The music video told the story of young latina Sarai Gonzalaz, carrying out her day-to-day journey in her community after getting her hair done. She came out of the salon as confident as can be in her superwoman splendor! Now, seven years later, Bomba Estero has taken Soy Yo to new heights as Dove has announced its initiative of #MyHairAMiModo, (translation: "my hair, my way."), extending on its launch of the Dove Love Your Hair Collection introduced earlier this year.


According to Dove's research 9 out of 10 women feel pressured to style their hair according to society's standards. The Latinx community, in particular, has also felt this weight as many have diverse hair types and conditions.


To ensure the success of #MyHairAMiModo, Dove began this intiative alongside Bomba Estereo. The two have come together to recreate the music video for the song Soy Yo, this time with Bomba Estero included along with the child star, Sarai Gonzalaz.


As the story behind the music video radiates the importance of developing confidence within the community by focusing on beauty establishments, Dove has also partnered with self-estemm expert Christine Gutierrez. Distinguished hairstylist Ona Diaz-Santin, who is one of many at the forefront of the conversation of self-expression through hair, has partnered as well. Together they have created the masterclass #MyHairAMiModo, in Diaz-Santin's salon, to give hairstylists the tools needed to confront hairsterotypes and spread positivity in their own establishments.



Ona Diaz-Santin

While progress has been made in promoting hair positivity and self-acceptance, there is always work to be done to ensure this mission flourishes. I hope Dove is able to continue this mission as it’s such an important message!  

Christine Gutierrez

It’s important for hairstylists to do their own inner work around any hair trauma and pain that they have experienced.

How have your personal hair experiences shaped the trajectory of your profession? 

Christine Gutierrez

During the Masterclass at the launch of #MyHairAMiModo, I shared a bit of my personal hair story from my childhood when I had an insecurity around showing one of my ears, so I would always wear my hair down in fear of showing my ‘fly away’ ear. I now lovingly call it my ‘fairy ear.’ I now encourage myself to wear my hair up and feel beautiful wearing my hair in all different ways! It took time, compassion, and personal growth to arrive there. But little by little, we can break the hair wounds and be the hair cycle breakers we are meant to be. Overcoming these insecurities and embracing myself as-is, helped build the foundation for the work I do now to help uplift others.


Ona Diaz-Santin

 So many ways… 

 

1. Passion and Inspiration: My personal experiences, my clients’ hair experiences and struggles, and the transformative hair makeovers I witness inspire me to give it my all within my industry.  

 

2. Skill Development: This continuous learning helps me as a professional to stay updated with the ever-evolving world of hairstyling. 

 

3. Empathy and Understanding: When you are chosen to be a part of someone’s journey with hair loss, texture issues, or scalp conditions etc., empathy and understanding – especially if you’ve been there – is a universal language.  

 

4. Specialization and Niche Expertise: It’s helped me to focus on challenges my clients may be experiencing, which allows me to cater to specific client needs and offer tailored solutions.


How can hairstylists properly and professionally address hair stereotypes and spread hair positivity in their salons and communities across the globe? 

 

Christine Gutierrez

It’s important for hairstylists to do their own inner work around any hair trauma and pain that they have experienced. Perpetuating hair stereotypes comes from unexamined belief systems and stories that we have picked up from our childhood, cultures, experiences, media, etc. Once we do our own unpacking, we recognize our own biases and can heal them to stop the cycles from repeating.  

 

Another important thing for hairstylists to do is to gain education on various hair types and be mindful of the clients they serve to ensure hair positivity and inclusivity. Additionally, hair professionals can promote an overall positive hair culture by using welcoming and affirming words for all types of hair. Including images and language that promote hair positivity is key in the salons as well.  


Ona Diaz-Santin

It starts with me, then I can share with others; It’s not just a haircut! It’s the following and more: 

1. Education and Awareness 

2. Inclusive Language and communication  

3. Representation and Diversity 

4. Personalized Consultations and Recommendations 

5. Collaboration and Community Engagement 

6. Continued Learning and Skill Development 

7. Empowering Clients 

 

By implementing these practices, hairstylists can create a salon environment that challenges hair stereotypes, promotes hair positivity, and celebrates the beauty of all hair types as a whole! This has a positive impact on my clients' self-esteem and contributes to a more inclusive and accepting hair culture in their communities and beyond. Like a friend once said: “if I can do it, I can teach it.” 



Christine Gutierrez


What remarks/reflections do you have from the #MyHairAMiModo Masterclass that took place on 10/17? What work still needs to be done to ensure this movement can flourish?  

 

The mission of #MyHairAMiModo is just getting started. Seeing the powerful stories shared from the women in the masterclass highlighted that we need even more time to unpack negative hair stories and get to the root of it (pun intended.) Once we can get to the root of these negative hair stories, we can detangle them, reframe them and choose an empowering hair story. I foresee more spaces for sharing and guiding people to become the hair cycle breakers they are meant to be.   

 

Ona Diaz-Santin

Dove has played a significant role in challenging beauty stereotypes, promoting body and hair positivity, and advocating for inclusivity. This is what I live for and a no-brainer, so I jumped at the opportunity to partner with Dove and Christine Guiterrez, our self-esteem expert. The class was beautiful, and more importantly the experiences of community filled the space. It was special for me for so many reasons. From having my friends from many different areas attend, to Dove and what the brand stands for, Christine building people up, the outpouring of pure love – I can go on, but for the sake of the readers, I’ll quit while I’m ahead. 

 

While progress has been made in promoting hair positivity and self-acceptance, there is always work to be done to ensure this mission flourishes. I hope Dove is able to continue this mission as it’s such an important message!


Dove invites latinas from all places to join in on the #MyHairAMiModo conversation on TikTok with the beats of Bomba Estereo's Soy Yo. Share your hairstory and tag #MyHairAMiModo and @Dove. Allies please engage with content and share within your networks! To learn more visit Dove.com/myhairamimodo.



Bomba Estereo (left) and Sarai Gonzalaz (right)





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